Macclesfield Christadelphian Church
HomeAbout UsContact UsThe BibleChurch ActivitiesSpecial EventsRecent TalksEarlier TalksBible Study TalksExhibition Event
1.0 Bibles Before 1611
1.1 Background: The English Reformation
1.2 Background: The Development of Printing
1.3 Wycliffe: The First English Translation
1.4 Knox: Supporting the Reformation
2.0 King James Verson 1611
2.1 Favoured Version for 300 Years
2.2 Rules for Translators
2.3 The Canon of Scripture
2.4 Tyndale's Earlier Work
2.5 Coverdale & the Great Bible
2.6 Support from Luther
3.0 Modern Versions
3.1 Updating the KJV
3.2 Methods of Translation
3.3 Word for Word Versions
3.4 Thought for Thought Versions
3.5 English Translations of the Latin Bible
3.6 Which Translation for Me?
4.0 What the Bible Says
4.1 God the Creator
4.2 The Word of God
4.3 God's Word in Prophecy
4.4 The Jews - God's Witnesses
4.5 Jesus - God's Son
4.6 Jesus - The Coming King
4.7 Our Need for God
4.8 God's Love for Us
4.9 Our Response
5.0 Where to Start
5.1 God's Inspired Word
6.0 We Would Like to Help
6.1 Conclusion
3.4 Thought for Thought Versions

Examples of Thought for Thought Protestant Translations and their objectives

The New English Bible. (NEB) conceived in the late 1940’s and finally completed in 1970. It was one of the first British attempts at what the translators called a dynamic equivalence translation and was well accepted in England because of its attempt to retain formal and traditional English vocabulary and diction. However, this has confined it to an English rather than international version. It has been updated to remove some of its limitations and to improve its style.

The Living Bible (LB), completed in 1971, is Kenneth N. Taylor's paraphrase of the American Standard Version. Easy to read and once immensely popular, it is often criticized for adding too much commentary to the biblical text.

Good News Bible (Today's English Version) (TEV), completed in 1976, was translated by Robert G. Bratcher with six other scholars. This very free, though very accurate, translation avoids the use of traditional biblical vocabulary and communicates especially well with youth and those not familiar with church language.

New International Version (NIV), completed in 1978, was the product of 115 evangelical scholars. Within a decade it became the best-selling English version, a position it still holds! It combines contemporary, literary English with traditional biblical vocabulary. A major revision of the NIV was released in early 2011. While it only changes about 5% of the text of the 1984 edition, the changes are significant, and it almost reads like a new translation.

The Message (Msg) - Eugene Peterson completed this paraphrase of the entire Bible in 2002. Peterson takes great liberties with words in his attempt to effectively communicate both the original thoughts and tone of the Scripture. The result is a very earthy, informal language.

To read Subsection 3.5, click here

To go back to main Section 3.0, click
here

To go back to the main Exhibition Event web page, click
here

HomeAbout UsContact UsThe BibleChurch ActivitiesSpecial EventsRecent TalksEarlier TalksBible Study TalksExhibition Event